Workforce Support Unit

 

The Social and Emotional Well Being (SEWB) Workforce Development & Support Unit at Nunkuwarrin Yunti is tasked with providing work support to you alongside what your management and agency are offering. The Workforce Development & Support Unit (WDSU) organise events annually that are attended by members of the Social and Emotional Well Being workforce. These events are designed for peer networking, sharing best practice information and hearing guest speakers.

What we do

The WDSU aims to assist in sustaining and developing a culturally appropriate and effective Social and Emotional Wellbeing Workforce. The National Indigenous Australian’s Agency provides funding for the WDSU to monitor and coordinate training and professional support to the SEWB workforce, which comprises of DPMC-funded Bringing Them Home and Link-Up Counsellors, Link-Up Case Workers, Mental Health Workers and Alcohol and Other Drugs Workers.

The WDSU supports the SEWB workforce through:

  • Peer support;
  • Development of cross-sector linkages;
  • Inter-agency cooperation;
  • Identification of training needs;
  • Coordination of mental health and SEWB training delivery with Registered Training Organisations;
  • Sourcing additional avenues of funding;
  • Supporting agencies in which SEWB workers are employed.

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How do these services help?

  • By ensuring that the SEWB workers have attained or are working towards the minimum qualification required for their role;
  • Facilitating training towards recommended qualifications;
  • Increasing access to additional training and development;
  • Reducing levels of burn-out;
  • Reducing staff turnover;
  • Supporting healthier workplaces.

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WDSU actions and involvement

  • Agency visits;
  • Annual state forums and role-specific network meetings;
  • Training needs analyses;
  • Connection to professional development;
  • Connection to cultural mentors;
  • Linkages to RTO and other agencies;
  • Connection to supervisors;
  • Supporting workplace development.

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General support

The WDSU Project Officers are there to back you when you need them. In addition to more formal actions and services, you can call on them to help you sort out day-to-day personal and professional challenges, such as finding time to undertake training, developing a rapport with people in the local community or managing the personal challenges of working in a remote location.

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Who are your Project Officers?

Jenny Lo
(08) 8168 8300
jennyl@nunku.org.au

Toni Arundel
(08) 8168 8300
tonia@nunku.org.au

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Forums and network meetings

As a part of the funded Social and Emotional Well Being workforce, you are required to attend at least two (2) of the Workforce Development & Support Unit organised events annually.

There are three role-specific meetings and two state forums organised annually. These meetings and forums (online or face-to-face) are designed for peer networking, professional development, sharing best practice information and hearing guest speakers.

You will be sent information about these events as we plan them. The Workforce Development & Support Unit covers travel, accommodation and catering for the face-to-face network meetings for workers funded by the Commonwealth National Indigenous Australians Agency (NIAA). Other social and emotional wellbeing workers may be considered. Applicants are required to advise your manager about your interest to attend and negotiate time off to attend (well in advance).

Network Meetings for 2024: – date/location to be advised

• Caseworkers Network Meeting
• AOD Network Meeting
• 1st State-wide Forum
• 1st Managers Network Meeting
• Counsellors Network Meeting
• 2nd State-wide Forum
• 2nd Managers Network Meeting

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Training

SEWB Workforce Development & Support Unit at Nunkuwarrin Yunti is tasked with providing work support to you alongside what your management and agency are offering. This support is mandated by the National Indigenous Australian’s Agency .

A part of our task is to find out the professional needs of each member of the workforce in terms of the skills required to enable workers to better handle their specific role as outlined in their Job Description. This is done through the Training Needs Analysis (TNA) survey that we do with all members of the SEWB workforce once a year.

A list of relevant short courses has been compiled in the following training calendar:

 SEWB workforce training calendar

Your agency is also aware that we need to upskill all members of the workforce to a minimum of Certificate IV level qualification in your specific service area. The Certificate IV in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care is one course that could be considered.

The Workforce Development & Support Unit’s role is to work with your management in supporting you through pathways towards that minimum qualification (if that has not been attained).

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Tools and resources

The ‘Feeling Deadly, Working Deadly’ Resource Kit is aimed at reducing stress and burnout, and enhancing wellbeing amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander alcohol and other drug (AOD) workers. It forms part of NCETA’s work on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worker Wellbeing. It was funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.

A new Infocus report collated by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has highlighted the characteristics of, and outcomes for, the Stolen Generations aged 50 and over.

This Framework provides a dedicated focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social and emotional wellbeing and mental health. It sets out a comprehensive and culturally appropriate stepped care model that is equally applicable to both Indigenous-specific and mainstream health services. It will help guide and support Indigenous mental health policy and practice over the next five years and be an important resource for policymakers, advocates, service providers, clients, consumers and researchers. Designed to complement the Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan and contribute to the vision of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2012-2023. It, therefore, forms an essential component of the national response to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

The Fifth National Mental Health and suicide prevention plan commits all governments to work together to achieve integration in planning and service delivery as a regional level.
This plan is also the first to specifically outline an agreed set of actions to address social and emotional wellbeing, mental illness and suicide amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as a priority, as well as being the first to elevate the importance of addressing the physical health needs of people who live with mental illness and reducing the stigma and discrimination that accompanies mental illness.

This Framework provides a dedicated focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social and emotional wellbeing and mental health. It sets out a comprehensive and culturally appropriate stepped care model that is equally applicable to both Indigenous-specific and mainstream health services. It will help guide and support Indigenous mental health policy and practice over the next five years and be an important resource for policymakers, advocates, service providers, clients, consumers and researchers.

This factsheet contains some of the principles, domains and determinants related to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives of SEWB and are presented within a holistic framework.

AH & MRC have lots of resources, toolkits posters and wellness cards that you can download for free and use with your community.

The new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan sets the policy direction for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing. It will guide the development of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policies, programs and initiatives over the next 10 years.

The new plan aligns with the National Agreement on Closing the Gap. It charts a new way forward for governments at all levels to work in true partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, communities and organisations.

The plan prioritises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled services as they are best placed to deliver these services. It also affirms the clear responsibility of mainstream services to be culturally safe and responsive.

The plan’s focus on holistic and place-based care will provide the best opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to live long, healthy lives that are centred in culture. It enables access to services that are prevention-focused, culturally safe and responsive, equitable and free of racism.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework (HPF) monitors progress in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes, health system performance and the broader determinants of health (such as employment, education and safety). The HPF is a comprehensive source of evidence designed to inform policy, planning, program development and research.

The PHN and ACCHO Guiding Principles recognise the commitment by Primary Health Networks and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations to work together to improve access to health services and improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Evaluation Project (ATSISPEP) was established to evaluate the effectiveness of existing suicide prevention services and programs. ATSISPEP aim to:

    • prioritise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ways of working
    • establish an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth forum
    • strengthen the evidence base for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicide prevention
    • develop an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural framework for suicide prevention services and programs.

Culture Care Connect or CCC brings together key streams of suicide prevention planning, coordination & activity across the network regions; including raising awareness, early intervention, crisis management and Aftercare Services.
CCC aims to:
• improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and suicide prevention outcomes
• build evidence and understanding through working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experts and those with lived experience
• support a culturally appropriate mental health system workforce
• provide early intervention measures that contribute to improved social and emotional wellbeing outcomes.

The Strong Born campaign has been developed by NACCHO in collaboration with the National FASD Campaign Working Group which includes multi-disciplinary staff from ACCHOs and ACCOs, and cultural and clinical FASD experts and researchers. The above link provides resources for health professionals and community.

The ICF is a classification of health and health-related domains. As the functioning and disability of an individual occur in a context, ICF also includes a list of environmental factors. To view the online ICF browser, click here.

Clinical supervision

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